Handel’s masterpiece - prepared and performed in just one day!

Mega Messiah

About

Mega Messiah brings together a massed choir, filling the stalls at the magnificent Donald Gordon Theatre at Wales Millennium Centre, to perform the choruses of Handel's masterpiece, Messiah.

Mega Messiah has taken place in November 2011 and in December 2012 and will be an annual event at the Centre. In 2013 it will take place on Sunday 3 November.

Leading the performances - the inspirational choral conductor David Lawrence, a master of the mega choir who holds the British record for conducting massed voices. The orchestra and soloists in 2011 and 2012 were rising stars from the Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama. In 2013, the orchestra is Sinfonia Cymru and friends and selected solos will be performed by students from the Wales International Academy of Voice.

 

Handel’s Messiah

The nation’s favourite choral work, Messiah, was composed by George Frideric Handel in 1741 and premiered in Dublin a year later as a charity event to support the sick and people in debt. It was also performed annually for many years in aid of the orphans of London’s Foundling Hospital, and to this day is often performed to raise money for charities, especially during the Christmas period.

Mega Messiah supports The Prince’s Trust Fairbridge Programme Wales and the Wales Millennium Centre Creative Learning programme. Find out more about the charities.

The Team

The team behind Mega Messiah includes David Jackson, a board member of Wales Millennium Centre, and a former Vice Principal at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama; Deborah Perkin, a documentary film maker and Fairbridge supporter; Viv Goldberg, arts producer and production manager. Mega Messiah 2013 is being promoted by the Orchard Media and Events Group Ltd, whose director, Tim Powell, sits on the Wales Development Committee of The Prince’s Trust.

The event has even inspired award-winning Guardian cartoonist Martin Rowson to produce a special Mega Messiah cartoon for the event, which has now become its visual identity.